The Stochastic Game

Ramblings of General Geekery

Posts with tag 'rant'

    The iPad Turned 10

    The iPad turned 10 a bit more than a week ago and I was somewhat shocked, although pleasantly surprised, to see the Apple blogosphere express their disillusion about ipadOS, led mostly by John Gruber’s piece: The iPad at 10 is, to me, a grave disappointment. Not because it’s “bad”, because it’s not bad — it’s great even — but because great though it is in so many ways, overall it has fallen so far short of the grand potential it showed on day one.
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    Happy New Year!

    Happy new year and other such holiday things to the 3 people who read my blog! I was in San-Francisco for new year’s eve and it was quite lovely. Apart from the sake of posting something new, this post is also to show off how PieCrust’s admin panel can now upload page assets (in this case, that would be the picture above… check the URL, it’s hosted right here). This feature will be part of the impending 2.
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    Overtime at Frostbite Cinematics

    These past couple days most of the video games development community was set on fire by some pretty bad article written by some pretty famous guy on some pretty high traffic website. I’m not going to comment on it – other people like Rami Ismail did that very well already. Interestingly enough, it revived the old debate about “passion” and “crunch”, and we’ve seen a fair number of interesting articles about it as a result.
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    Design For South Paws

    Sarah Baird talks about what us left-handed people have put up with all our lives, and all the way back through history: Day in and day out, though, the biggest hurdle faced by lefties isn’t discrimination — it’s mundane, basic functioning. Almost all facets of society, from ink pens to urban design, are crafted and structured to support, abet and cater to the right-handed majority. For lefties, functioning means a constant, conscious consideration of how they can reverse or modify their natural behavior in order to most effectively move around in the world.
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    Fucking pick one

    Paul Stamatiou has been getting a lot of attention about his article “Android Is Better”. And beyond the obvious flamebait (which seems to be working quite well), he makes a couple of points that I agree with: Most people probably use more Google services (for good or bad) than Apple services, and will find the Android experience better integrated if they tried it. Notifications on Android are a million times more useful and productive than on iOS.
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    The Death of Google Reader

    After the infamous announcement that Google was shutting down Google Reader, there was a lot of debates around the use of online services, especially free ones, and whether we can trust a company to keep such services up indefinitely. Of course, nothing can last “indefinitely”, and probably nothing will last until you die. You have to expect that Gmail, Facebook, iTunes, Amazon Kindle and any other service you’re currently using won’t last for more than, say, 20 years (and that’s being generous).
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    The Problem with iOS

    These past few months I’ve seen a fair number of articles about people who switched from iOS to Android. Most of those articles talk about the differences between the 2 operating systems, and how some of those differences proved to be significant enough for whoever was switching: multitasking, notifications, the so-called “open vs. closed”, etc. That’s fine, but these specific bullet point list vs. bullet point list comparisons seem to be missing the higher level view of what’s really going on: iOS is just not working the way it should anymore.
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    The post-PC era

    You can see this kind of headline all over the web these days, especially with Apple fanboy tech bloggers: the PC is dead, all hail tablets and smartphones. The argument is also made for video games consoles, who are supposedly on the way out to be replaced by, guess what, tablets and smartphones. Even Jeff Atwood is getting on the bandwagon. I don’t disagree with the facts here: most indicators we have on the market right now show that, indeed, desktop and laptop computers have declining sales while mobile products have an ever-accelerating growth.
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    This is why people buy Macs

    A few months ago I set out to get a new laptop for my wife. She only had one requirement, after having shared a Macbook Pro with me for the past couple years: that it ran Windows (queue OS flamewar). I quickly decided I wanted to give her something slick and light, and look at the new line of ultrabooks. I then narrowed the choices down to the Samsung Series 9 and the ASUS Zenbook by reading reviews online… but that was just the easy part.
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    The journey to Diaspora

    Recently, app.net has gotten a lot of attention, but I just don’t see the appeal. It’s basically a Twitter clone that you have to pay, and all of this for what? So that the API is nicer to developers and you don’t see a couple of “promoted tweets” once in a while? It sounds like a very shallow goal for a supposedly “disruptive” communication platform. Sure it has some kind of grand plan to get us to the next level of connectedness through, err, innovative apps and mashups or something.
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    When Windows "just works": part 2 (the work around)

    Back in the first part of this 2-part post we looked in some detail at how MacOS mounts network shares, and how badly designed this feature is compared to its Windows counterpart. We’ll now look at the solution I’m using to fix the problem, which is to mount network shares in a consistent way for a multi-user machine. The work around Thanks to the power of UNIX, you can get around the problem by spending hours reading boring documentation, searching useless forums, editing obscure configuration files and generally speaking wasting your time for something Windows gets right in 2 clicks.
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    When Windows "just works": part 1 (the problem)

    If you asked me a year ago what was the most awesome feature that Windows has and that MacOS doesn’t, I would have probably scratched my head for a bit, mentally sorting through all the obscure advanced things you can do with the Windows SDK and a few lines of code, or all the little things that make organizing files so much easier than with the horrible Mac Finder. But if you ask me now, I’ll reply straight away this: mapped network drives.
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    Why PieCrust?

    Recently I realized I’ve been working on, and talking about, PieCrust for quite a while, but I have never given any reason as to why on Earth I have written my own CMS and static site generator when there are so many already out there. Like many open-source projects, PieCrust was born out of 2 very self-centered stimuli. One: it’s fun to write new stuff! And by “new”, here, I’m of course talking about things that were new to me at the time.
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